Soap Making

I am not an expert in Soapmaking, I am beginning to learn and research information. I hope that within a few months I will have researched and experimented different soap techniques.

I will only write the very basics here o f soapmaking, and leave some internet links of what I have researched so far.

Why make your own soap?

  1. I never had thought about making my own, but since I began researching this is what I have discovered:

Soap bought at the store shouldn’t be called soap but should be detergent!

Glycerin is produced naturally when soap is made in the saponification process. In comercial soaps it is extracted from the soap that is sold. That means the soaps that we buy have no glycerin but only chemicals. Glycerin is an exceptional moisturizer and carrier that is extracted from the soap to be sold to pharmaceutical, food and cosmetics industry, so unfortunately the soaps we buy end up just drying our skin.

Read more in this site:

http://curious-soapmaker.com/seven-reasons-why-make-your-own-soap.html

2. I can make my own super soap at home! Wow, that just sounds awesome! I can choose my own ingredients I put in the soap. I can make my own experiments!

3. I can make sooo many beautiful different soaps! Cold process soaps seem more challenging but the reward is worth it! I can’t wait to try it, I have lots of ideas 🙂

Ex:

4. Since I have eczema and my kids are sensitive too, I am hoping that these soaps will be less harsh on our skin.

Soap Making Basics

Soap making can be divided into 2 diferent categories:

  • Melt and Pour
  • Cold Process and Hot Process

Good description on this lnk: http://curious-soapmaker.com/how-to-make-soap-3-basic-methods.html

 

Basically, Melt and Pour is where you buy the soap base which is heated and then you add fragrances or essential oils and colour to your soap.

You then pour the melted mixture into molds and let it harden. Within 24 hours you can unmold your soap and use it.

Cold process and Hot Process is where you make your soap using raw materials. This is where you need lye+water/milk and  natural oil/fats to create the saponification process which produces soap+glycerin.

Cold process is done mixing the various ingredients without heating. Cold process soaps take 4~6 weeks to cure before they should be used.

Hot process is done mixing the ingredients and is then heated. Soaps can be used within a week (curing time is hardy any).

See this link for a good explanation:

http://pegasussoaps.blogspot.pt/2010/04/cold-vs-hot-process-soap-whats.html